Donald E. Larson1

Donald E. Larson
Don and Carol Larson 2013
     Donald E. Larson married Carol (?)

Citations



  1. SUN CITY CENTER — She us-es a footstool to do laundry. He sawed the legs off the kitchen table so they could sit comfortably together. Don and Carol Larson are what the world calls dwarfs or little peo-ple. Their response: So what? "We don't con-sider ourselves disabled," Don Larson, 74, told Apollo Beach Elementary students at the Great American Teach-In last week. "Being little has never really been a big issue." Don was born with Langer mesomelic dwarfism, a condition rarely diagnosed in the United States. Carol, 68, has a chromosomal disor-der. The two met at a Little People of America convention in 1981 and knew after a couple of dates that they had both found the one. They're both 4 feet 2. "Her torso is longer than mine, but my limbs are shorter," Don explains. "When I used to drive I'd sit on two cushions," Carol chimes in with a giggle. "Don has to use extensions to reach the pedals." After nearly three decades of marriage, the Larsons are happily retired. They moved to Florida from Virginia, where Don worked more than 30 years as a graphic illustrator for the federal government. Carol was a medical transcriptionist. The two love to reminisce about the old days. "As a boy I didn't think much about my size," Don said. "My parents and sister were average, and no one treated me any differently." Don helped coach his high school's sports teams. He studied draft-ing. He won a world record for model-rocket building and has an astounding 90 stamps on his passport. "I've been able to do just about anything I wanted to do," he said. "I never had any trouble with people not wanting to give me a chance. My skills speak for them-selves." Carol has the same positive attitude. As one of eight brothers and sisters, she learned early on how to get things done de-spite her height. After nearly three decades of marriage, the Larsons are happily retired. . "My parents and sister were average, and no

    Sun City Center couple's size is no barrier to full life
    By Sarah Whitman, Times Staff Writer Sarah Whitman Tampa Bay Times In Print: Friday, November 26, 2010

    They moved to Florida from Virginia, where Don worked more than 30 years as a graphic illustrator for the federal government. Carol was a medical transcriptionist. The two love to reminisce about the old days. "As a boy I didn't think much about my size," Don said. He studied drafting. He won a world record for model-rocket building and has an astounding 90 stamps on his passport. "I've been able to do just about anything I wanted to do," he said. "I never had any trouble with people not wanting to give me a chance. My skills speak for themselves." Carol has the same positive attitude. As one of eight brothers and sisters, she learned early on how to get things done despite her height. "When I'm at the grocery store and I can't reach something, I ask for help," she said. "It's no big deal. People are always nice. No matter what your situation, there's always a way around it." Despite medical concerns associated with dwarfism, the Larsons are in good health. There is a heart condition linked to Carol's chromosomal disorder, but she hasn't contracted it. Don's biggest concern is how aching hands affect his golf swing. The couple never had children, but nieces and neph-ews now take the place of grandkids. The children accept them for who they are, Carol said. When a student at last week's teach-in asked whether people ever stare at the cou-ple, Don was surprised. If they do, he doesn't notice. He's busy playing bocce ball, spending time with friends at Sun City Center and making travel plans. He wants to take Carol on a few more cruise ships. After all, nothing will keep them from living life to the fullest.